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Why You Should Eat Leafy Greens | Mark’s Daily Apple

By now, you’ve probably seen the TedX video from Dr. Terry Wahls, a former Tae Kwon Do champ and current MD diagnosed with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (the kind that degenerates your brain and has you relying on a wheelchair to get around) who describes her transformative experience with a dairy-free Paleo diet rich in fruits, vegetables, grass-fed meat and organs, and seaweed. Relegated to and totally dependent on a wheelchair in 2007, by 2008 Wahls had adopted the diet and was commuting to work on a bicycle and now incorporates this kind of intensive directed nutrition into her primary care and brain injury clinics. If you haven’t, go ahead and take twenty minutes out of your day to go watch it. It’s a real eye-opener (but not all that surprising to longtime readers). Think of it as a grass-fed, wild-caught success story.

I already linked to this video a couple months back, so why bring it up again, you might ask? Back when I watched it for the first time, something caught my ear: the focus on vegetation. Wahls speaks of eating nine cups of plants every day, with three coming as leafy greens, three as sulfur-rich vegetables, and three as brightly colored fruits and vegetables. She explains why each category is so important, not just for someone looking to reverse MS, but for anyone who wants to be healthier in general. She got me excited all over again about incorporating more vegetation into my diet. It’s not like it’s lacking or anything, either. I had just taken it for granted – some spinach here, a Big Ass Salad there, some roasted Brussels sprouts for dinner – and instead focused on the animal food. If you remember, the base of the old Primal Blueprint food pyramid was vegetation, and I still maintain that the optimal Primal plate is overflowing with mineral-and-antioxidant-rich plant matter. I think the (understandable) tendency of some to knee-jerkily rebel against anything resembling Conventional Wisdom means that leafy greens and other vegetables fall to the wayside. That’s a mistake, I think, and it’s important to understand that eating both loads of leafy green things and things that crawled, flew, or swam is not mutually exclusive. You can do both. You should eat both. And I’m going to tell you why.

Before I start, when we talk about greens, we mean leaves. So things like:

I haven’t covered all the regional leaves utilized in various cuisines across the world. These are the basics that most people reading this will be able to find at their grocer, farmers’ market, farm stand, and/or frozen section. Other vegetables like broccoli or certain types of cauliflower are green, but aren’t “greens.” A discussion on those guys will come next week.

Terry Wahls likes greens for the minerals and vitamin content. With that, I agree. Greens represent a convenient, essentially non-caloric, nutrient-dense source of otherwise hard to obtain minerals, like magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese. Heh, so what have those minerals done for me lately, you might be wondering. Well…

Magnesium

Of all the minerals we Primal folks talk up, magnesium may very well be the most widely supplemented. It’s certainly one of the most important; over 300 physiological processes in the human body require magnesium to function optimally, foremost among them the production of ATP for energy. Your mitochondria use magnesium to produce ATP, the body’s energy currency. So if it’s so important, why must we all supplement? How did people get enough magnesium before Natural Calm? There are a few factors, including the disappearance of magnesium from our drinking water and top soil, but the fact remains that most of us aren’t even trying to get enough magnesium through our food. That should change. Eating greens like spinach and chard will go a long way toward adding dietary magnesium.

Calcium

Of all the minerals we discuss, calcium may be the least-supplemented or most-ignored. That’s a mistake. While I’ve certainly called into question the wisdom of supplementing with handfuls of calcium pills without considering the roles of vitamins D and K2 in bone mineralization, we still need calcium. We still need that raw building block (and crucial trigger for neurotransmitter release). And if you’re not eating dairy, leafy greens are probably your best source.

Potassium

Potassium is another nutrient a lot of people miss out on, especially if they’re overcooking their meat (the juices contain the potassium), avoiding tubers and fruits (both are high in potassium), and shying away from avocados because of the linoleic acid (don’t stress out over a little whole-food omega-6, folks, especially when it comes in such a creamy, green package). I just got done writing about the importance of the potassium:sodium ratio in regulating blood pressure, so if you’re not eating the aforementioned potassium-rich items (and even if you are), be sure to eat your greens.

Manganese

Your mitochondria use manganese to manufacture manganese superoxide dismutase, a potent mitochondrial antioxidant. With inadequate superoxide dismutase, you increase your chances of ischemic brain injury (think stroke) or developing a neuropathology. Simply put, manganese keeps your mitochondria running cleanly.

Unless you’re eating bones, drinking blood/meat juice, and eating hoof, fur, and tail, you’ll be missing out on magnesium, potassium, and calcium by excluding leafy greens.

Terry Wahls also likes greens for their vitamin content, specifically B-vitamins like folate. I tend to agree, and I’ll highlight a couple key nutrients that greens provide.

Folate

Though it’s widely touted as particularly crucial for expectant mothers and the development of the babies they bear, folate is also important for anyone’s general health. Inadequate dietary folate intake can lead to elevated homocysteine levels (which can impair endothelial function and is a risk factor for heart disease). Modern processed grain-based foods are usually fortified with folic acid, but you’re not eating that stuff. And unless you’re also eating plenty of liver, if you shun greens you are most likely lacking this vital nutrient.

Betaine

Betaine is another important but oft-ignored nutrient that many people, even Primal eaters, lack. Like folate, it regulates proper homocysteine levels. Betaine also helps maintain liver health. Spinach is perhaps the greatest vegetable source of betaine (other than maybe wheat germ, but who wants that?). Spinach tastes pretty darn great steamed and tossed with olive oil, sauteed in bacon fat, or raw on a salad, so go ahead and eat some.

Besides the micronutrient content, there are other benefits of eating leafy things, especially in concert with the other foods on your plate. For those interested in eating less or losing weight, eating a salad with your meal spontaneously reduces overall caloric intake. I dunno about you, but I think any weight loss “diet” should include spontaneous caloric reduction. Although we know that caloric intake factors into weight loss or gain, we also know that many, if not most, people have difficulty consciously reducing calories. It simply doesn’t work very well, so the key is to spontaneously reduce calories by eating satisfying foods that don’t derange our satiety hormones. That’s what going Primal is all about, and research shows that eating salad (perhaps a Big Ass Salad?) can help in that regard.

Although I’m coming up dry right now, I remember reading research that showed eating leafy greens, like spinach or kale or a green salad, alongside your grilled steak reduced the absorption of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) from the meal. HCAs are carcinogenic and form with high-heat cooking, especially on meat, and absorbing fewer of them is a good thing. I’d be much obliged if anyone could pull up the research. In the meantime, I’ll keep looking.

But the real beauty of leafy greens? They are prepackaged whole food “supplements” with safe and well-balanced vitamin and mineral levels. You eat a few cups of spinach, a romaine lettuce salad, maybe some kale chips and you’ll be getting a nice healthy range of nutrients. Your overall caloric intake won’t really be impacted and you’ll be safe. No, you won’t have a nutritional profile from the manufacturer telling you exactly how many milligrams of magnesium your bowl of sauteed kale contained, or the amount of betaine in that head of spinach you chopped up and turned into a salad. The nutrient range will vary from head to head and leaf to leaf. And that’s okay. Heck, that might even be optimal. I can imagine an organism that evolved eating a varied diet with lots of ups and downs and big blocks of this mineral in one meal and another big block of that vitamin in the next. I can imagine an organism that evolved eating food, rather than prepackaged, preordained, pre-meted out collections of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Can you?

That’s why it’s food, without a label: it doesn’t need to be exact. So if you ever find yourself paused in front of the grocery store display, agonizing over the respective folate content of two particularly large heads of romaine lettuce and frozen – totally unable to act – hang it up. Start back at square one. Realize that this is food that’s meant to be eaten, not over-analyzed.

If it’s green, leafy, crisp, and free of chemicals, it’s safe, healthy, and good to eat. Adding such a food to your diet – in sauteed, steamed, boiled, dehydrated, baked, or raw form – will most likely help, so eat it! I’m not saying you have to eat three heaping platefuls of vegetation, like Terry Wahls did. I’m suggesting that adding leafy greens to a diet lacking in them will almost certainly improve the nutritional content of that diet.

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Why You Should Eat Sulfur-Rich Vegetables | Mark’s Daily Apple

“Be sure to eat your sulfur.”

When’s the last time someone told you that? Except for the Wahls talk, probably never. My mother certainly didn’t.

Few people even know much about sulfur besides the whole rotten egg, fire and brimstone thing. It’s a mineral with a role in our physiology, but it doesn’t showboat like the obscenely corporeal calcium, forming bones and teeth that you can literally feel and see. It won’t immediately soothe your restless muscles or put you right to sleep, like magnesium. Unlike zinc, it doesn’t figure prominently in the production of a sexy hormone like testosterone. And though you can take iodine and get an instant reaction from your thyroid, taking sulfur doesn’t produce anything tangible. In short, sulfur lurks in the background and keeps a low profile.

So why does Terry Wahls promote the consumption of three cups of sulfur-rich vegetables every day?

Before we get to that, let’s define what we’re discussing here. What exactly qualifies as a sulfur-rich vegetable? Any and all fibrous non-leafy (although some have leaves, they’re never the culinary focus) usually-green vegetables that steam well and emit a distinctive, offensive-to-some odor probably contain considerable amounts of sulfur and can be called “sulfur-rich”:

  • Brassicas – cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, and related vegetables.
  • Alliums – onions, shallots, garlic, leeks.
  • Lots of edible stalks, lovely smells if you cook it wrong, and a tendency to go well with lemon butter. That sort of thing.

Back to Wahls’ recommendation to eat more sulfur. What’s the justification for it?

Well, by weight, sulfur is one of the most abundant mineral elements in the human body, coming in at around 140 grams for the average person. And as any regular reader of this blog should know, you don’t get to be an abundant mineral in human physiology by accident. Nope: sulfur is involved in hundreds of physiological processes. Let’s explore some of the big ones:

Sulfur is required for the synthesis of glutathione, one of our premier endogenous antioxidants. I’ve talked a bit about glutathione before. It’s one of the good ones.

Sulfur, in the form of disulfide bonds, provides strength and resiliency to hair, feathers, and feathered hair.

Sulfur is required for taurine synthesis. Taurine is essential for proper functioning of the cardiovascular system, our muscles, and the central nervous system.

Sulfur binds the two chains of amino acids that form insulin. It may seem like we bag on insulin a lot, but it’s absolutely necessary for life.

Sulfur is found in methionine, an essential amino acid (think meat, eggs, cheese), and in cysteine, a “non-essential” amino acid (think pork, poultry, eggs, milk).

But wait a minute. If sulfur can be found in all the animal foods we’re already eating – beef, chicken, eggs, pork, dairy – what’s the point of eating all those sulfur-rich vegetables?

There are two reasons, I think, for focusing on “sulfur-rich” vegetables. First, it’s helpful to group things. We’ve got the leafy greens, we’ve got the brightly colored produce (more on this next week), and we’ve got the sulfurs. We want to eat things from all three categories, and making the latter a separate group ensures that we won’t “overdose” on spinach. It’s just a neat, slick way to get the pro-vegetable message across and increase variety of intake. Second, and most importantly, sulfur-rich vegetation tends to come with extremely potent organosulfur compounds that offer a lot of benefit to those who eat them. Animal sources may contain plenty of sulfur-rich amino acids, which we undoubtedly require, but they don’t contain the organosulfur compounds.

Let’s explore them and go over a few of their potential benefits.

Alliums and Their Allyl Sulfur Compounds

Garlic, onions, shallots, and leeks all contain various organosulfur compounds, some of which show major potential.

Garlic-derived organosulfur compounds have shown promise as anti-cancer operatives in in vitro studies.

Various garlic sulfides protected mice from peroxidative damage and increased glutathione activity in the liver. The garlic sulfides were delivered via corn oil, but I would recommend garlic butter if you’re looking for a fatty vessel.

When cooking meat, using an onion and garlic-based marinade reduced the formation of heterocyclic amines (a carcinogenic compound).

Onion-derived sulfur compounds improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic rats (but garlic-derived compounds did not).

Brassicas and Their Various Organosulfur Compounds

Sulforaphane, an organosulfur compound found in broccoli (especially the sprouts), cabbage, brussel sprouts, and cauliflower, inhibited mitochondrial permeability and reduced oxidative stress by increasing glutathione activity in rats.

In inhabitants of a Chinese farming community, where airborne pollution is high and liver cancer incidence is elevated, drinking a sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout drink was also able to increase the urinary excretion of those airborne pollutants.

Broccoli sprouts reduced oxidative stress in type 2 diabetics, as shown in a double blind placebo-controlled trial.

Organosulfur compounds from all kinds of brassicas have the potential to reduce or counteract the carcinogens derived from high-heat cooking.

Eating brassicas along with a carcinogen salad prevented the absorption of said carcinogens.

How to Prepare These Vegetables (and Preserve Their Compounds)

You can’t just go eat a head of cabbage like an apple, or throw together a lovely salad of raw onion, raw garlic, and raw broccoli stalks. I mean, you could, but it’d be pretty unpleasant. No, you want to cook these vegetables, because they taste better and are likely more nutritious that way. But you also don’t want to miss out on all the delightful organosulfur compounds we’ve been discussing. You want the optimal prep method – or close to it.

Onions and Garlic

If it’s beneficial allyl sulfur compounds you want to consume, eating your alliums raw and sliced is the ticket. Heat breaks down the compounds. The only problem is that those same allyl sulfur compounds that might fight cancer, boost antioxidant status, and ward off liver damage are the very things that make raw onion and garlic so pungent and unpalatable. Some people enjoy the stuff raw – not me, besides a little chopped garlic in my salad dressings and some raw onion on a salad – but most prefer them cooked. Luckily, studies suggest that by slicing your alliums and letting them sit for at least ten minutes before cooking, you allow the myrosinase enzyme to release more allyl sulfur compounds and make them more resistant to heat.

Broccoli

Steaming is the way to go. One study found that lightly steaming broccoli rendered the sulforaphane three times more bioavailable than after heavily cooking it. I like to steam my broccoli until it’s bright green and tender enough to pierce the stalk with a fork with an emphatic push. Soggy, dull green broccoli is the worst – and it’s not nearly as beneficial. One group of scientists corroborate my method, saying that three to four minutes of light steaming – until “tough-tender” – is ideal.

Cabbage

Again, research confirms that lightly steamed cabbage offers more bioavailable organosulfur compounds than cabbage cooked at high heat in the microwave. Chop it up to your desired consistency. Let sit for a few minutes so the myrosinase gets to work. Stick to four or five minutes of steaming. Then, toss with your fat of choice. If you want to microwave, use the low or medium setting.

Cauliflower

Cut into small florets, let sit for ten minutes (to let the myrosinase enzyme do its work and make the glucosinates more available), and steam or bake. I’m a big fan of baked cauliflower tossed with turmeric, curry powder, cayenne, salt, and olive oil.

Brussels Sprouts

Although I’m sure the “best” way to cook sprouts (like all the other brassicas) is to quarter and steam them for five minutes, I can’t help but think you’re missing out on the perfect opportunity for some prime caramelization in the oven. So yeah, I’ll steam Brussels sprouts and toss with butter or olive oil and enjoy them just fine, but every once in awhile I’ll finish those suckers off in the oven on high.

Everything Else

Slicing, sitting, and steaming is always a safe bet.

For all these foods, try to embrace the bitterness. Love the bite, because that bite and that bitterness means you’re getting those interesting compounds. Enjoy the crispness of lightly cooked brassicas from time to time. It may take some getting used to, and you might have to play with different flavor combinations so that the bitterness will work, but you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Avoid the mush.

As I mentioned in the greens post, three cups a day are probably unnecessary. Just try a bunch from the ones I’ve listed, see what you like, and try to get some sort of sulfur-rich vegetable into your mouth at least a few times a week. Or, go all out and give the three cups a day routine a shot. You might really like it and thrive on it.

What’s your favorite sulfur-rich vegetable? How do you eat it? Let me know in the comment section!

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10 Reasons To Eat An Apple A Day | Care2 Healthy Living

Your mom didn’t use the term powerfood but she knew about apples. “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” was the first nutritional advice myself and many children heard from their moms. For this reason we call them “the first powerfood.”

Health Benefits:

1. Apples are filled with soluble fiber (5 grams)

  • This fiber has been shown to reduce intestinal disorders, including diverticulitis, hemorrhoids and possibly some types of cancer.
  • Helps control insulin levels by releasing sugar slowly into the bloodstream.
  • Cleanses and detoxifies, which helps eliminate heavy metals, such as lead and mercury.

2. Apple pectin helps reduce cholesterol levels by lowering insulin secretion.
3. In two studies researchers found that eating five apples a week lowered the risk for respiratory diseases like asthma.
4. According to Chinese Medicine: Apples strengthen the heart, quench thirst, lubricate the lungs, decrease mucous and increase body fluids.
5. Apple cider vinegar can help prevent the formation of kidney stones.
6. Studies indicate that eating apples daily can reduce skin diseases.
7. According to a Brazilian study, eating an apple before a meal helped women lose 33 percent more weight than those who didn’t.
8. An apple has only 50-80 calories and has no fat or sodium.
9. Apples are packed with vitamins C, A , and flavonoids and with smaller amounts of phosphorus, iron, and calcium.
10. Apples provide a source of potassium which may promote heart health.

So there you have it…lots of good reasons why it is good for you to eat an apple a day! I like apples so much that when I started living by myself I substituted those sugar laden cereals with an apple.

Interesting apple facts:

  • There are more than 7,500 varieties of apples. When I lived in England I tasted many different and delicious apples that I never see in Canada.
  • The apple tree is a member of the rose family.
  • When you eat an apple you are consuming a lot of air; 25 percent of their volume is air!
  • Apples have 5 percent protein.
  • Apple trees can live to be 100 years old!
  • The largest apple weighed three pounds.
  • In ancient Greece when a man proposed to a woman would he would toss her an apple and if she decided to catch it, it meant she accepted.
  • The original proverb about eating an apple a day, which came about in 1866, was: “Eat an apple on going to bed, and you’ll keep the doctor from earning his bread.”
  • It takes the energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.

To get the most from eating powerfood apples:

  • Eat apples with skin to get the nutrients; many of the nutrients are in the skin or just under the skin (most of the vitamin C and vitamin A are in the skin).
  • Apples have been found to be the most heavily pesticide-contaminated produce products according to The Environmental Working Group. The most common pesticides found on apples are Permethrin and DDT. Non organic apples are often waxed which is not digestible. Try to buy organic apples or if you cannot, wash them thoroughly before use preferably with a fruit and vegetable wash or peel them.

Apple Cautions:

  • As apple seeds are toxic when eaten in high doses, they should be avoided by pregnant or breastfeeding women and children.
  • Apple juice concentrate can be full of arsenic when it is not organic according to Dr. Oz in his research. They did not find arsenic in organic apple juice.

“Any fool can count the seeds in an apple. Only God can count all the apples in one seed.” -Robert Schuller

Recipes with apples:

Socialite mountaineer breaks silence about 1996 Everest disaster

  • Sandy Pittman, now known by her maiden name, Hill, survived the deadly blizzard that lashed Mount Everest
  • Eight people died in the tragedy including two expedition leaders
  • Hill became the second American woman to ascend all of the Seven Summits
  • After the tragedy, Hill was depicted as a wealthy woman who paid her way up the peak in Krakauer’s book Into Thin Air
  • She’s now breaking her silence ahead of the ‘Everest’ film that’s based on the mountain tragedy

The socialite mountaineer who was lambasted in a book nearly 10 years ago is breaking her silence ahead of the blockbuster film release of Everest, which is based on the 1996 mountain tragedy she survived.

Sandy Pittman, now known by her maiden name, Hill, survived the deadly blizzard that lashed Mount Everest and left eight people dead, including two expedition leaders considered the best in their field.

The former fashion editor was in the process of becoming the second American woman to ascend all of the Seven Summits during the dangerous climb.

Numerous publications, including the New York Times and Vanity Fair, depicted Hill as a wealthy woman who paid her way up the peak.

Even worse for Hill was the depiction that journalist and fellow mountaineer Jon Krakauer wrote of her in his best-selling book, Into Thin Air, about the incident.

Krakauer was on assignment for Outside magazine during the disaster and implied in his controversial book that Hill endangered herself and others by behaving like a ‘diva.’

‘This came from a source who had a vested interest in crafting a dramatic story,’ Hill told The New York Post.

‘I guess it served a purpose for him to bury me.

‘I was an easy target. Back in those days you could get away with destroying someone’s life and flogging them with innuendo.’

In the weeks after the disaster, it was reported by Krakauer and other media that Hill brought a cappuccino machine to the Himalayas, along with her favorite Dean & DeLuca coffee beans.

Those luxuries allegedly came to symbolize the then-41-year-old’s privileged position, since she paid around $65,000 like the rest of her team for a place in the group to climb the 29,000-foot peak.

‘It conjures up this image of a giant professional espresso maker, when in fact it was a little coffee pot that percolates from the bottom, and just 8 inches tall,’ Hill told The Post.

‘You hear climbers pat each other on the back joking about so-and-so not being able to get out of his tent without his strong cup of coffee and he’s considered this macho guy.

‘But I’m at base camp, where a yak has carried up this coffee pot weighing less than a pound, and I’m making this frothy milk by putting powder in a jar and shaking it up and imagining that it’s foaming.

‘It’s really easy to attempt stereotyping. That was his [Krakauer’s] tactic.’

In addition, Krakauer implied in his book that Hill, who is now 60 years old, was carried up the summit.

‘The Sherpa, huffing and puffing loudly, was hauling the assertive New Yorker up the steep slope like a horse pulling a plow,’ he wrote.

When her team successfully reached the summit of the mountain on May 10, 1996, a blizzard hit and they became stranded on the slope.

The climbers, who were starved of oxygen and unable to see because of the white-out conditions, waited to be rescued in the hazardous ‘Death Zone.’

‘We were stranded a quarter of a mile from our tents, but we were blinded when the storm struck,’ Hill said to The Post.

‘It was like swimming in a glass of milk – a very turbulent glass of milk – for another eight to 10 hours.

‘I felt close to dying, but then hypoxia [oxygen deprivation] took over my brain and I started hallucinating I was in a tea house with a warm fire in it, so I stopped being afraid.

‘I started waving my arms and calling out to catch the eye of the waiter.’

Initially, her survival story was celebrated until the release of Krakauer’s article, in which he portrayed her as a ‘privileged villain,’ according to The Post.

At the time, Hill was married to one of the richest and most powerful men in New York City, Bob Pittman, and they as a couple epitomized ‘nouvelle society.’

Since surviving the disaster, Hill is now a competitive athlete who wrote two books and has contributed to a number of sports and outdoors magazines.

The divorcee now lives in Venice, California with her two dogs and a bird and continues to be an adventurer who surfs and climbs volcanoes.

In the film 2015 Everest, English actress Vanessa Kirby portrays Hill in the film.

Hill shared that she isn’t sure she will see the new film ‘Everest’ that’s also staring actor Jake Gyllenhaal, but said ‘it would be thrilling to see those big mountain vistas.’

CHRONOLOGY OF THE 1996 MOUNT EVEREST DISASTER:

Contact Ford Customer Service

Contacting Ford Customer Service Center

Ford is one of the largest US-based automobile companies. Despite financial turmoil, the company managed to redefine itself and push sales with changes to customer service and the look and feel of most Ford models. Ford also offers customer financing so customers can use in-house financing instead of buying through another company.

If you’re a Ford customer and you want to contact customer service or you want to learn more about the company or available vehicles, you can call, write or email a customer representative. You can also get in contact with a local dealership if desired.

to leave a comment about your customer service experience.

Contact Info

Customer service contact information is available for many different situations. If you want immediate action, the call center can answer your questions right now, but you may have to wait a bit and put up with transfers to multiple departments. If the question is less pressing, an email is the best way to go. If you want to send communication by mail it will take longer to reach Ford.

Phone Contact Numbers

  • Customer Relationship Center (US): 1-800-392-3673
  • TDD (US): 1-800-232-5952
  • Customer Service (Canada): 1-800-565-3673
  • US Customer Service for MyFord Touch, SYNC or Ford Navigation (English): 1-800-392-3673
  • US Customer Service for MyFord Touch, SYNC or Ford Navigation (Spanish): 1-800-392-3973
  • Canada Customer Service for MyFord Touch, SYNC or Ford Navigation: 1-800-565-3673
  • Marketing Program Customer Service: 1-800-334-4375
  • MyFord Magazine Customer Service: 1-800-335-1357

Mailing Address

Ford Motor Company
Customer Relationship Center
P.O. Box 6248
Dearborn, MI 48126

Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited
Customer Relationship Centre
P.O. Box 2000
Oakville, Ontario, L6J 5E4

Official Website

The Ford official website at http://www.ford.com/ sells cars and products. Customer service is clearly a secondary focus. You have to search for a small Contact Us link to find any information on customer service at all.

Customer Service Email

A customer service email address is not available, but you can contact Ford customer service using a contact page. This is a secure form, but that does not mean you can share your financial information or personal information in the email. Though we sent an email to the customer service department we are not guaranteed a response, according to Ford customer service.

Our Experience

The Ford customer service center phone number leads to an automated response center. The automated response answers the phone, as usual, and offers the caller various options. Press 1 for English and then press 0 five times with a slight pause between each. You will move directly to the customer service queue. We waited on hold for less than a minute before a representative answered our call. The representative located our nearest Ford service center and even offered to connect us with the center to make our maintenance appointment.

Contact CostCo Customer Service

Contacting Costco Customer Service Center

Costco is a wholesale warehouse store. In order to shop Costco online of offline, you must pay for a membership. In some cases, the warehouse will offer new customers a temporary membership for one to two weeks to test out the warehouse shopping experience. Some of the items available for sale online can be purchased from home and picked up in a local Costco warehouse, but others require shipping to your home.

to leave a comment about your customer service experience.

Contact Info:

Phone Contact Numbers

There are a few numbers customers can choose from when attempting to contact Costco customer service.

  • Costco online member services: 1-800-955-2292
  • General member services: 1-800-774-2678
  • Costco travel customer service: 1-877-849-2730
  • Costco pharmacy: 1-800-607-6861
  • Business customer service: 1-800-788-9968

Mailing Address

We found two addresses for customer service contact. One is a mailing address for the corporate office and the other is the physical address for the Costco corporate office building.

Costco Corporate

P.O. Box 34331

Seattle, WA 98124

Or

Costco Corporate – Physical Address

999 Lake Drive

Issaquah, WA 98027

Official Website

The main page of the official Costco website is http://www.costco.com/. Customers can choose to log in to their shopping account using the link at the top of the page. You can also check on your order using the order number included in the verification email.

Customer service contact information is listed under the Customer Service tab. There is no contact us page.

Customer Service Email

Instead of offering a customer service email address, Costco offers a contact form https://costco.egain.net/system/selfservice.controller?CONFIGURATION=1001&PARTITION_ID=1&CMD=STARTPAGE&USERTYPE=1&LANGUAGE=en&COUNTRY=us. The form asks for the subject of your email, details of the message and some personal information like name, email and contact phone number. You can also add your membership account number or order number if desired.

We sent an email to test the response time for a simple question. When we receive a response from the customer service department we will update our experience.

Our Experience

All of the customer service phone numbers for Costco customer service are for members, unless you want to learn more about membership. We called the general membership line to test phone customer service. We were given the opportunity to press 0 to talk with a representative during the automated message. After pressing 0 we were placed on hold (with music) to wait for the next representative. The total call was less than three minutes. We asked about membership pricing and the customer service representative answered without pause.

As one of the largest companies in the United States as well as the world, we expected customer service from Costco to be top-notch. Costco definitely lived up to it’s reputation. We erceived a response to our email inquiry with 4 hours from a customer care representative. They answered our question as well as provided additional information not requested. See below:

From: Costco Customer Service
Date: Sat, Mar 24, 2012 at 3:10 PM
Subject: Other [#3592290]
To: Richard B

Dear Richard,

Thank you for your e-mail to Costco Wholesale.

No, you do not have to be a member or purchase a membership online to place an order, however all non members will be charged a 5% non member surcharge except California state residents.

Thank you,

Chelsey
Costco Wholesale Corporation

Note this message was submitted through the costco.com web site customer suggestion page on 03/24/2012 10:43:19 PST
Comment/Suggestion/Request/Question Text:
Do I have to purchase a membership to buy an item online?

Personal Information:
First Name: Richard
Last Name: B

What is your experience with Costco customer service?